FPGA and MorphOS ?
  • MorphOS Developer
    jacadcaps
    Posts: 1683 from 2003/3/5
    From: Poland
    There are FPGAs that include real PowerPC cores (Virtex series), but they are pretty slow for our standards. I am sure you could get an FPGA with enough juice to emulate a slow PPC but then what would be the point?
  • »23.10.18 - 09:37
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  • Butterfly
    Butterfly
    bennymee
    Posts: 81 from 2004/4/14
    From: Netherlands
    Quote:

    Papiosaur wrote:
    Hello all,

    is it possible for a FPGA to emulate a PowerPC compatible with MorphOS ?

    It exist a hardware low price could launch MorphOS ?

    A Vampire with a module PPC in the FPGA ? as a 1200 with a PowerPC...

    [ Edité par Papiosaur 23.10.2018 - 11:16 ]


    Isn't the Vampire created because there are no successors to the 68060 ?


    You can buy PowerPC cpu's which are faster and cheaper then FPGA solutions.


    A solution as the Minimig - with a real cpu and a chipset in the FPGA would be a better and cheaper, but offcourse, replace the cpu with PowerPC and put SAGA in the FGPA chip.


    [ Edited by bennymee 23.10.2018 - 13:08 ]
  • »23.10.18 - 11:06
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  • fmh
  • Butterfly
    Butterfly
    fmh
    Posts: 67 from 2012/8/23
    From: USA
    What about the Coldfire Processor? 68XXX compatible and but my understanding or the fastest and expensive. Not PPC compatible though. So I guess more of a Classic Amiga clone than a Morphos machine.

    [ Edited by fmh 27.10.2018 - 07:55 ]
    Macmini G4-1.42, 1GB RAM, MorphOS3.9
  • »27.10.18 - 11:51
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  • Moderator
    Kronos
    Posts: 1816 from 2003/2/24
    ColdFire is as much compatible with 68k as the Tabor is with proper PPC.

    Without active development both in the OS and the applications such an Amiga would end up slower than an actual 060 (or only run a few selected apps).

    100% OT offcourse...

    An FPGA that could beat an G4 in running PPC code is properly still a decade out.
    --------------------- May the 4th be with you ------------------
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  • »27.10.18 - 12:09
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  • rob
  • Butterfly
    Butterfly
    rob
    Posts: 95 from 2008/7/22
    Quote:

    fmh wrote:
    What about the Coldfire Processor? 68XXX compatible and but my understanding or the fastest and expensive. Not PPC compatible though. So I guess more of a Classic Amiga clone than a Morphos machine.


    The Elbox Dragon had a Coldfire CPU and ran Amiga OS but they can't have been satisfied with the overall performance of the product since they decided to cut their losses on the R&D and not proceed with production.
  • »27.10.18 - 14:21
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  • Order of the Butterfly
    Order of the Butterfly
    KennyR
    Posts: 421 from 2003/3/4
    From: #AmigaZeux, Gu...
    There are limit to FPGA speed, defined by quantum effects like leakage and transistor die size in the chip itself. Not only will it take a very long time to get one that's as near as fast as a 2004-era G4, it might not actually ever happen.

    Not with that technology anyway. More chance of custom "3D printed" ASICs being accessible to hobbyists IMO. And not for many years.
  • »27.10.18 - 16:15
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  • Jim
  • Yokemate of Keyboards
    Yokemate of Keyboards
    Jim
    Posts: 4700 from 2009/1/28
    From: Delaware, USA
    Quote:

    Kronos wrote:
    ColdFire is as much compatible with 68k as the Tabor is with proper PPC.

    Without active development both in the OS and the applications such an Amiga would end up slower than an actual 060 (or only run a few selected apps).

    100% OT offcourse...

    An FPGA that could beat an G4 in running PPC code is properly still a decade out.


    Basically, recompilation with manual work required for commands that work differently, aren't implemented, or have alternatives that aren't directly interchangable via a cross compiling.
    Messy,but some companies that supported the 68K (including a major laser printer manufacturer) went this way.

    However, Freescale/NXP has never offered their best Coldfire CPUs (the super scalar Coldfire V5s) for sale to the general public.
    There are 200-233 MHz V4's still available (you can even get them directly at a good price if you buy in lots of 300).

    Still, pretty slow (and the best V5's make a P1022 look like a speed demon).

    Power 9 folks, if we want to continue legacy compatibility, or X64 if we want commodity hardware.
    "Never attribute to malice what can more readily explained by incompetence"
  • »27.10.18 - 21:11
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  • Moderator
    Kronos
    Posts: 1816 from 2003/2/24
    Quote:

    Jim wrote:

    Messy,but some companies that supported the 68K (including a major laser printer manufacturer) went this way.



    Sure if you got 100% control over the limited stack of SW your HW will ever run those issues become minor.
    --------------------- May the 4th be with you ------------------
    Mother Russia dance of the Zar, don't you know how lucky you are
  • »28.10.18 - 05:06
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  • Yokemate of Keyboards
    Yokemate of Keyboards
    Andreas_Wolf
    Posts: 10018 from 2003/5/22
    From: Germany
    > recompilation with manual work required for commands that
    > work differently, aren't implemented, or have alternatives
    > that aren't directly interchangable via a cross compiling.

    Such manual work wouldn't be required with recompilation. After all, that's the point of using a compiler: translating the source code into the correct opcodes of the target CPU. Problem would be with running existing, already compiled binaries where there's no source code available anymore to recompile.

    > some companies that supported the 68K (including a major
    > laser printer manufacturer) went this way.

    Yes, HP didn't need to run binaries compiled for their old m68k-based printers on their newer ColdFire-based printers. They could simply recompile the sources.

    > Freescale/NXP has never offered their best Coldfire CPUs
    > (the super scalar Coldfire V5s) for sale to the general public.

    While this is true, availability of the ColdFire V5/V5e chips is not the real problem, but documentation is:

    http://www.atari-forum.com/viewtopic.php?p=333280#p333280
    http://www.atari-forum.com/viewtopic.php?p=333429#p333429

    > There are 200-233 MHz V4's still available

    Even up to 266 MHz for the V4e.
  • »29.10.18 - 22:35
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